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May242016

05:40:47 am

Cancer / Illness :: Cures For Chronic Liver Disease

The liver is a vital digestive organ that the body cannot survive without. There are a number of diseases that can impair the liver's ability to function, which can lead to serious health problems. Not all liver illnesses are treatable. Chronic liver disease is the gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. These diseases can include cirrhosis of the liver, alcoholic liver disease, liver fibrosis, hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and sarcoidosis. In this article, we'll examine the symptoms of liver disease and possible treatments.



Chronic liver disease includes any long term liver diseases, such as hepatitis and cirrhosis. Chronic liver conditions tend to progressively destroy liver tissue. Serious liver disease can ultimately lead to a live transplant being required. Liver diseases can sometimes be hard to diagnose because symptoms can vary according to patient. Common symptoms can include jaundice, loss of appetite, anemia, light colored stools, nose bleeds and frequent headaches.



Many people associate alcohol abuse with liver disease, since the liver processes alcohol so it can be eliminated from your body. If you consume more alcohol than the liver can process, then the resulting imbalance can injure the liver by interfering with its normal breakdown of protein, fats and carbohydrates. There are three kinds of liver diseases related to alcohol consumption: fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis, which is the most serious type of alcohol-induced liver disease. Cirrhosis refers to the replacement of normal liver tissue with scar tissue. Between 10 and 20 percent of heavy drinkers develop cirrhosis, usually after 10 or more years of drinking.

The symptoms of alcoholic liver disease are serious and include fluid in the abdomen, bleeding from veins in the esophagus, an enlarged spleen, high blood pressure in the liver, changes in mental function, coma, kidney failure and liver cancer. The first step in treatment is to stop drinking. A doctor may suggest changes in diet and certain vitamin supplements to help the liver recover from the alcohol-related damage. Medications may be needed to manage the complications caused by the liver damage. In advanced cases of cirrhosis, the only treatment option may be a liver transplant. However, active alcoholics usually do not qualify as organ recipients.

It's important to remember that it's possible to live for years with chronic liver disease if you receive the proper medical treatment and halt behaviors that may worsen your condition. Anyone with alcohol-induced liver disease will improve their health and life expectancy if they stop drinking. Patients who do not stop drinking are likely to suffer a variety of life-threatening health problems caused by alcohol-related liver damage. Taking control of the disease before it takes hold of you is the key to your recovery.|The liver is a vital digestive organ that the body cannot survive without. There are a number of diseases that can impair the liver's ability to function, which can lead to serious health problems. Not all liver illnesses are treatable. Chronic liver disease is the gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. These diseases can include cirrhosis of the liver, alcoholic liver disease, liver fibrosis, hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and sarcoidosis. In this article, we'll examine the symptoms of liver disease and possible treatments.

Hepatitis is common chronic liver disease. It is the inflammation of the liver, resulting in liver cell damage and destruction, and can be categorized in two groups; acute hepatitis and chronic hepatitis. Some people do not recover fully from acute hepatitis and develop chronic hepatitis, as the liver continues to sustain more damage and inflammation. Hepatitis is considered chronic if symptoms persist longer than six months. Symptoms for chronic hepatitis are usually mild. Although the liver damage continues, its progression is usually slow. Some individuals may experience no symptoms, while others may experience poor appetite, fatigue, low fever, upper abdominal pain and jaundice.



Many people associate alcohol abuse with liver disease, since the liver processes alcohol so it can be eliminated from your body. If you consume more alcohol than the liver can process, then the resulting imbalance can injure the liver by interfering with its normal breakdown of protein, fats and carbohydrates. There are three kinds of liver diseases related to alcohol consumption: fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis, which is the most serious type of alcohol-induced liver disease. Cirrhosis refers to the replacement of normal liver tissue with scar tissue. Between 10 and 20 percent of heavy drinkers develop cirrhosis, usually after 10 or more years of drinking.

The symptoms of alcoholic liver disease are serious and include fluid in the abdomen, bleeding from veins in the esophagus, an enlarged spleen, high blood pressure in the liver, changes in mental function, coma, kidney failure and liver cancer. The first step in treatment is to stop drinking. A doctor may suggest changes in diet and certain vitamin supplements to help the liver recover from the alcohol-related damage. Medications may be needed to manage the complications caused by the liver damage. In advanced cases of cirrhosis, the only treatment option may be a liver transplant. However, active alcoholics usually do not qualify as organ recipients.

The treatment that you'll need for chronic liver disease will depend on your specific symptoms. Treatments usually include bed rest, drinking extra fluids to prevent dehydration, avoiding unnecessary medications so that the liver has fewer chemicals to process, avoiding alcohol and eating a well balanced diet. Further treatment will depend on the type and the extent of disease. This could include medications like ribavirin, lamivudine, steroids and antibiotics. The most important element of treatment will be the patient's attitude and active participation. It is possible to lead a full and active life with this chronic disease if the patient is willing to take special care of this vital organ.|The liver is a vital digestive organ that the body cannot survive without. There are a number of diseases that can impair the liver's ability to function, which can lead to serious health problems. Not all liver illnesses are treatable. Chronic liver disease is the gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. These diseases can include cirrhosis of the liver, alcoholic liver disease, liver fibrosis, hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and sarcoidosis. In this article, we'll examine the symptoms of liver disease and possible treatments.

One of the dangers of chronic liver disease is that there are few symptoms and they don't show up until the disease is in an advanced stage. Hepatitis can linger in the body and produce a chronic infection that lasts for years. This can eventually lead to liver cirrhosis and, in some cases, liver cancer. Signs and symptoms of cirrhosis include abdominal pain, general fatigue, intestinal bleeding, itching, jaundice, loss of interest in sex, nausea and vomiting, small red, spider-like blood vessels under the skin or easy bruising, swelling in the abdomen and legs caused by fluid accumulation, weakness and weight loss.

Many people associate alcohol abuse with liver disease, since the liver processes alcohol so it can be eliminated from your body. If you consume more alcohol than the liver can process, then the resulting imbalance can injure the liver by interfering with its normal breakdown of protein, fats and carbohydrates. There are three kinds of liver diseases related to alcohol consumption: fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis, which is the most serious type of alcohol-induced liver disease. Cirrhosis refers to the replacement of normal liver tissue with scar tissue. Between 10 and 20 percent of heavy drinkers develop cirrhosis, usually after 10 or more years of drinking.



The symptoms of alcoholic liver disease are serious and include fluid in the abdomen, bleeding from veins in the esophagus, an enlarged spleen, high blood pressure in the liver, changes in mental function, coma, kidney failure and liver cancer. The first step in treatment is to stop drinking. A doctor may suggest changes in diet and certain vitamin supplements to help the liver recover from the alcohol-related damage. Medications may be needed to manage the complications caused by the liver damage. In advanced cases of cirrhosis, the only treatment option may be a liver transplant. However, active alcoholics usually do not qualify as organ recipients.

It's important to remember that it's possible to live for years with chronic liver disease if you receive the proper medical treatment and halt behaviors that may worsen your condition. Anyone with alcohol-induced liver disease will improve their health and life expectancy if they stop drinking. Patients who do not stop drinking Substance Abuse are likely to suffer a variety of life-threatening health problems caused by alcohol-related liver damage. Taking control of the disease before it takes hold of you is the key to your recovery.[/spin]




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